From St. Louis, to Sporty's, to Wheeling, and then finally to home - by Flygirl

 It took seven hours of flying to get where we were going, and the only source of air-conditioning was a small fan that sprayed water. It took a bit of time getting used to the unsettling arrangement of being stuck in the back with stuff piled behind, in front of, next to, and on top of me. 

    It was very enjoyable and hilarious to take my first cross country flight with my mother. It was very worrying though because as the flight was coming to the end, we had a tricky landing. Something was rough with the engine; it was making sounds that were confusing.  When we were about to land my mom gave Dave the handle, and we started to rapidly descend. Dave pressed and pulled buttons, levers and switches so we didn’t crash and kick the bucket. 

    We were very worried about the plan before we even went to St. Louis because Dave was having issues with the radio. It was a very intense time, especially because the day after they arrived in St. Louis we left the ground at 9:00 a.m. - with no time to rest or to spare.  Meanwhile, waiting on the ground was my father and Dave’s wife anxious for our safe arrival. 

View from my seat

View from my seat

Sportys!

Sportys!

At the airport in Wheeling

At the airport in Wheeling

Safe landing at home

Safe landing at home

Ugh

Friday, April 8th - Not Flying.  We've been plagued by winter 2.0 so far in April.  When the wind hasn't grounded us, we get this - ice pellets.  So, we continue to wait for a blue sky day.

Sky Gypsies Take Flight!!

Dave got his logbook signoff for insurance purposes, so we are now to free to fly.  A huge shout out to Bruce for that along with his willingness to share his expertise with 170s.  On March 26, we climbed in the plane and took our inaugural flight as pilot/copilot.  We were pressed for time, so our first flight was a sunset flight.  Enjoy the pics! 

First Adventure - Ground Looping!

It's a windy damn day in these parts making it a good time to blog about flying since one can't actually get out there to fly.  Last week, we did manage to get off the ground to perform some pattern work in our early attempts to learn how to land and take off in this adventure machine. Landing #1 - ground loop.  We ended up 180 degrees in the opposite direction in a foot of snow. Our first unpaved landing, on a paved runway no less!  It turns out our 170 has a big damn rudder compared to the nose wheel planes we're accustomed to flying making ground loops a when instead of an if.  We feel very accomplished having gotten ours done early in our training.  So, what do you do when your plane has gone off runway?  Easy, shut it down and push it back in place.  That's just what we did and followed up with four more decent takeoffs and landings.  

I once heard a joke that passengers land on runways - pilots land on centerlines.  As it goes, we'll continue to aim for centerlines but content ourselves with landing in the direction we intend.  In the meantime, we'll be dreaming of blue skies cause today is not that day.